DearTomorrow,

What made Michigan so beautiful was its ability to go through seasonal changes. Recently, the seasons have been shifting with longer summers, shorter winters, and fall/spring appearing to disappear.

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Dear future generations,

One of my favorite parts about growing up in Northern Michigan was being able to experience all of the great outdoors including sandy freshwater beaches, lush trails through forests, and endless activities in the snow. What made Michigan so beautiful was its ability to go through seasonal changes. Recently, the seasons have been shifting with longer summers, shorter winters, and fall/spring appearing to disappear. Shorter winters and longer summers reflect sea levels rising and worse flooding during storms.

Winter and summer is not what it used to be as a child, starting later and ending earlier. You could almost guarantee planning a Halloween costume for winter temperatures, and now it’s possible for temps above 60 degrees Fahrenheit. With summer temperatures at all time highs and water levels rising, the beaches I once loved to spend every day on are now underwater. Future generations are missing out on natural wonders of MI and they don’t even know it. These environmental problems continue to rise from changes in air circulation and weather patterns from increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The seasons have never been different, leaving me concerned with rapid biodiversity loss which is essential for the ecosystem harmony and productivity for every organism, no matter how small.

While seasons continue to change, I am hopeful for our future because of the continuation of discussion with younger generations on climate change. By emphasizing the importance of sustainability and reducing human-caused climate change, we make the best of future generations. We have seen an advancement in bio-friendly technology to reduce greenhouse gases in the production of alternative fossil fuels and food, which would stop seasons from changing. The more discussions on climate change issues, the better chance we have to solve the loss of seasons.

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